Speech Language Pathologist Salary

For better communication, pronunciation and enunciation are crucial. It is big part of the image we want to convey for ourselves. It gives lasting impression and bolster self-confidence. Speech and hearing disorder then can have a huge impact in a person’s self-worth and confidence.

That is why audiologists and speech language pathologists’ work are very crucial. This work is also highly collaborative to improve communication skills those who are afflicted. It is collaborative work as speech pathologist have to work with several people surrounding his/her client and that includes parents, teachers at school and even the physician or specialists like audiologist and surgeon to be able to plan out the best treatment and alternatives with the patient.

We already discussed the work of audiologists in several articles and in this part, we would like to make focus on the work and speech language pathologist salary.  Clients would be children, adults and people with stoke, dyslexia or affliction in neuron and sensory brain functions.

There are around 135,00 speech language pathologists or more known as speech therapists that is working in the United States. Speech therapists are employed in hospitals, nursing homes and even schools.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics has predicted that speech pathologists will also be in demand for the aged as studies have shown that speech and language disabilities increased. Survey in the medical field showed that around 20,000 to 25,000 speech therapists will be needed in three years time to accommodate the growing clientele.

So if you can do all the work indicated above, then you might be wondering how much the speech pathologist salary is. Consider this as a salary guidespeech-therapist-and-senior for you and to those you know who are interested to take this path as a vocation and profession.

While there is a so called Standard speech language pathologist salary , keep in mind that the kind of workplace, number of hours rendered at work and other trainings and certifications acquired will have a bearing in your over-all salary.  It will also depend if you are working inhourly basis, full-time or part-time.

In a survey released by the American Speech Language Hearing Association, the speech therapists from 2005-2013 are paid annually for about 33-37% amounting to an annual salary $75,000. Those who are in full-time private practice as Speech Language Pathologist (SLP) can earn around  $73,000.

For SLP who are doing the clinical work, annual salary will be around $70,000 whereas those who are administering or doing the supervisory work especially in hospitals can earn as much as $90,000 to $ 100,000

Other variables that cause the variance in the speech language pathologist salary are the kind of hospitals – whether it is primary or district and whether it provides a rehabilitation center and if it is in-patient or out-patient care.

Also based in the survey, the highest SLP salary is United States of America is in West area (urban and sub-urban areas of Arizona, California, Washington, Hawaii and Colorado)  while it is $8,000 lower in the Midwest  (i.e. states of Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, and Dakota).

Salaries also increased in direct proportion to years of experience and additional certificates offered by the American Speech Hearing Association (ASHA). As one of ASHA directors said, If you consider taking the path of a Speech therapist, enroll in a medical school that gives training and internship and if possible direct field placements. It is a competitive field so take opportunities to be able to practice especially lots of patience for speech therapy sessions.

Also with the huge population boom and a large chunk are ageing, health conditions related to impairment of  speech and language will be on the rise. Stroke and hearing loss among ageing population will be needing the speech therapist. Also there are now speech therapy sessions for kids and toddlers with speech impairments and this also deals a separate kind of work and dedication.

 

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